Buddha, nagging monk and Nepali Congress Cadres

 

We recently had Buddha Purnima, remembering the birth, enlightenment and death of Buddha. We pride ourselves that Buddha was born in Lumbini in modern-day Nepal, around the year 563 BCE. But how much do we learn from him? How much, we as a Nepali read his story and teachings and follow?

Here I draw two parallel modern Nepal story where some Nepali are doing opposite of what Buddha taught.

Buddha’s teaching: 

  • Buddha and his disciples

One day in monsoon season Buddha was walking by the jungle with his disciples. On the way they reached a river which was starting to flood due to monsoon rain and there was a beautiful young girl wandering by the riverbank trying to cross the river. Buddha saw that and offered his help to the girl. Holding her hand Buddha helped her cross the river; the girl thanked him and went her way, Buddha and his disciples went their way.

When they reached their destination, one of the monk expressed his unhappiness about the incident, Buddha smiled and said nothing. A few days later Buddha was preaching about meaninglessness of earthly relationships, the monk again said “As monks, we are not permitted a woman, how could you then hold the hand of that girl?”

This time Buddha replied, “I left the girl a long time ago at the riverbank, however, you seem to be holding her hands still.”

The moral of this story is that mental attachment to an idea or earlier experience blocks the full experience of the present here and now. Attachments slow the mind, interfering with appropriate responses to the immediate situation. And eventually distract us from our progress and future development.

Two stories of Modern Nepal:

  • Historic Peace deal in Nepal and Kanak Mani war cultivation company

12-Point Understanding between the Seven Political Parties and Nepal Communist Party (Maoists) leading to Comprehensive Peace Agreement between the Government of Nepal and the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). In this agreement, the parties pledge to work towards democracy, peace, prosperity and social advancement and ending autocratic monarchy. The parties agree that the National Army and the Maoist army shall be under the supervision of the UN or any other reliable international actor, to conduct fair elections, and to accept international mediation during the dialogue process. Including through the establishment of a National Human Rights Commission, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission and a National Peace and Rehabilitation Commission.

Although main leadership and majority of population have moved forward from the war there are people like Mohan Baidhya (Kiran) and Netra Bikram Chand (Biplab) complaining about Maoist and Nepal Army integration. There are also Kanak Mani Dixit and company nagging about the war time events and complaining about TRC and NPRC. Kanak Mani Dixit war Cultivation Company benefits a lot from war, the more war and death the more of news for his media group and more of so called human rights agenda for his empire and eventually more donation. His mere existence is a sad existence who lives on the benefits from people’s death. Fundamentally the same applies to Netra Bikram Chand too.

The moral of this is that unnecessarily nagging to an idea or every war time experience blocks the full experience of the present here and now. Attachments to their personal benefits from war slow Nepal’s progressive socio-political change and prolongs transition period, interfering with appropriate responses to the immediate situation. And eventually distract us from our progress and future development of the country. This will benefit people like Netra Bikram Chand and Kanak Mani Dixit but the country will suffer.

  • CPN (Maoist Centre) and Nepali Congress leaders & protesting NC Cadres

Ruling coalition partners–Nepali Congress and CPN-Maoist Centre–have finally agreed to partner up for elections of mayors in two metropolitan cities of Nepal.

Some of the Nepali Congress cadres in Bharatpur are furious about the alliance and think teaming up with Maoist is unacceptable because they were the enemy at war time. Maybe some of these Nepali Congress cadres still have hangover of war like the disciple of Buddha whereas the leadership has moved forward from it.

The moral of this story is that few Nepali Congress cadres still have mental attachment to war era idea or earlier experience which has blocked the full experience of the present here and now. The present or now of Federal Democratic Nepal is that there is no war and there are no enemies. There was 12-Point Understanding and then A Comprehensive Peace Agreement. The appropriate response to immediate situation is that all the parties who believe in democratic republic should stand together by eliminating fassist Rashtriya Prajatantra Party Nepal of Kamal Thapa. The attachments to the war era seems to have slowed the minds of Nepali Congress cadres in Bharatpur, interfering with appropriate responses to the immediate situation.  And eventually this and likely events distract us from our progress, peaceful politics and future development.

 

Ranju Darshana, Mhairi Black and the Fearless Girl

Although human being have aimed for the stars and reached moon many of us haven’t been able to change our mind-set; either we are in developed and liberal western countries or less developed and conservative countries like Nepal.

Our mind-set is dominated by Abrahamic male God or alike, who is in Richard Dwakin’s word “a petty, unjust, unforgiving control-freak; a vindictive, bloodthirsty ethnic cleanser; a misogynistic, homophobic, racist, infanticidal, genocidal, filicidal, pestilential, megalomaniacal, sadomasochistic, capriciously malevolent bully.” I often see the parallel between Dwakin’s definition of God and politicians around us. Just like Dwakin’s God, politicians are mainly male, control-freak, racist and often bloodthirsty ethnic cleanser.

But there are signs of some light at the end of this dark tunnel.

Bibeksheel Nepali Party’s nomination of 21-year-old Rajnu Darshana to run for the Mayor of Kathmandu Metropolitan City in the upcoming local government elections slated for May 14 has already changed so many things in Nepali politics. Her candidacy is that sign of light at the end of this dark tunnel of Nepali (and world) politics. Today she stands like Kristen Visbal’s Fearless Girl looking at the well-known Charging Bull. Today, she stands in front of Nepali politics’ Charging Bulls; old male politicians who usually come from dominating Bahun-Chhetri caste group. She is challenging them in so many things.

There have already been so many criticism in social media about her age, gender and experience. And exactly those are so called “values” she stands against. The more trolling and criticism means the more people have been hurt by her candidacy, imagine what will follow if she wins.

She has already hurt a lot of misogynist male egos – she is a woman.

She has already hurt a lot of unforgiving control-freak male politicians – she is ‘hot off the press’.

She has already hurt so many malevolent old bullies – she is so young.

Trolling and attack on young women in politics is not new and happens in the most developed and democratic societies too. In the UK, when Mhairi Black, a Scottish (SNP) politician defeated Labour Shadow Foreign Secretary Douglas Alexander to become youngest Member of UK Parliament for Paisley and Renfrewshire South in 2015, she was just 20 years old university student. Mhairi Black proved that the fearless girl in politics is not just a piece of art, given the chance she can triumph over the charging bull.

Mhairi was also criticised (a lot) that time and still criticized for her age, gender, appearance and everything trolls can think of. Every time the trolls attacked, she has stood up better and smashed the evil. After being called a “carpet munching bull dyke” by a Twitter troll she stood up for LGBT rights and online safety.   After a troll said, “She’s got nothing to worry about. Nobody’s gonna wanna rape that”, she stood up and exposed the internet trolls who targeted her with shocking messages after her appearance at the rape clause protest in George Square. In the long list of abuse to her, are not just trolls but also one of Scotland’s most prominent female academics, Jill Stephenson, who described Mhairi Black as a “slut”.

Whether that is trolling of Mhairi Black and Ranju Darsana or any other young woman in politics, it shows the level of mind-set we have in this world. This exposes the vulnerability of human society on the road to equality and prosperity. This highlights the need of more fearless young girls in politics to challenge our mind-set.

Whatever the outcome of election is, Ranju Darsana has already won the cause. The cause of equality, freedom and change. It is an invitation to the young people of Kathmandu on the road to CHANGE. It is an invitation to the women of Kathmandu on the road to EQUALITY and FREEDOM. It is an invitation to the men of Kathmandu on the road to MUTUAL RESPECT. And most importantly it is a challenge to the charging bull of Nepali politicians that THIS IS NOT A POLITICS-AS-USUAL.

 [Pictures above, The Kathmandu Post, Huffington Post UK and google]